Reviews for Orlando Pabotoy’s “Sesar”

See what the media is saying about the Ma-Yi Season Opener, SESAR.

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GET DISCOUNT TICKETS HERE

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New York Theatre Guide

“Portraying both father and son, as well as a variety of other Shakespearean and contemporary characters, Pabotoy displays impressive linguistic and physical skills. He rails in pantomime against the winds of a hurricane, magically shrinks to boy-size then grows to manhood and back again. He speaks, or hypnotically whispers or sings, not only in modern and Shakespearean English, but also in Fijian and Visayan. Director Richard Feldman and his production team build the atmosphere around him via vivid screen projections on the stark white walls of designer Junghyun Georgia Lee’s set, quick blackouts that speed up time, then an extended blackout where it is easy to believe there are two actors on stage conversing. And yes, having staged a show entirely in a bathroom, Feldman could not resist an homage to the shower scene in Psycho. It’s a small film tutorial in a production full of lessons, both specific (Fijian and Phillipino history) and universal (“Regret was Caesar’s revenge. Which eventually made Brutus want to die. Regret is a storm. A great one.”). Pabotoy & company will be teaching these truths through November 1. Lend them your ears.”

Stage Biz

Sesar is the piece all solo shows want to be when they grow up. Although, Orlando Pabotoy plays so many characters if feels like there is a huge cast peopling the stage in this astounding production.

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Theaterscene.net 

“Musical interludes, crashing thunder and battle noises are adeptly depicted by sound designer Fabian Obispo. Oliver Wason’s striking lighting design veers from realism to fantasy with its fluctuations. Stylized footage of the Philippines, hurricanes, and news broadcasts are the chief features of Dan Scully’s mesmerizing projection design.

Filled with sentiment, Sesar is an uplifting and engaging experience.”

 

 

 

 

The Front Row Center 

“Last season, the Ma-Yi Theater Company sent Richard III to high school in their tragicomedy hit, Teenage Dick. In Sesar, they send Julius Caesar to the bathroom. But where the halls of Richard’s school were fraught with peril, this loo, in a house in Fiji of all places, is a sanctuary. It is where a 14-year-old from the Philippines, who has been “seduced” by Shakespeare’s language, can have some privacy in a crowded house. Having borrowed a copy of Julius Caesar from the library, this lad spends his free time memorizing Cassius’s famous “The fault is not in our stars,” soliloquy. “

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Lighting&Sound America

“As Pabotoy concludes, his Shakespearean encounter with his father would reverberate down through the years: “I would recite that speech of Cassius in front of my history class. I would recite it at an audition for the Shakespeare Theatre in DC. I would recite it at the Juilliard School. I would recite it in a bathroom in a theatre on the island of New York City. Ten minutes; ten minutes and they may be hooked.”

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Theaterscene.net 

“Director Richard Feldman’s consummate staging combines guiding Pabotoy’s performance with the technical elements into a stimulating production. Junghyun Georgia Lee’s awesome gleaming white cavernous bathroom set adds an epic dimension to the presentation. There is also a delectably colorful twist for the finale. Ms. Lee’s costume design includes a snappy outfit for Pabotoy and neat accessories.”

Photo Flash: Ma-Yi Presents World Premiere Of Orlando Pabotoy’s SESAR

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PHOTO GALLERY BY LIA CHANG (BACKSTAGE WITH LIA CHANG)

Ma-Yi Theater Company is presenting the World Premiere of SESAR, written by and performed by Orlando Pabotoy who previously acted with Ma-Yi, in his playwrighting debut, October 20 – November 1, 2018. Helmed by Richard Feldman, SESAR is now in previews for a Wednesday, October 24 opening night on Theatre Row at The Beckett (410 W 42nd St). Tickets can be purchased by calling 212-239-6200; or online.

ABOUT “SESAR”
After watching an excerpt of “Julius Caesar” on television, a 14-year Filipino boy locks himself in the only family bathroom to dive head-first into the world of ancient Rome, determined to make sense of Shakespeare’s famous tragedy. The boy’s father, a former town mayor now exiled because of his democratic beliefs, joins his son in the bathroom, and using his own experiences, teaches him real-life lessons about power, love, and loss.

With Set and Costume Design by Junghyun Georgia Lee, Lighting Design by Oliver Wason, Sound Design by Fabian Obispo, Projection Design by Dan Scully and Rachael Gass as Production Stage Manager.

LINK TO ARTICLE

More photos from Lia Chang

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TICKETS ARE DISCOUNTED FOR A LIMITED TIME

Preview of SESAR  
with code: TRMOCAPRE ON OCTOBER 23rd
LINK BELOW or enter code at:
www.telechargeoffers.com or call 212-947-8844.
TRMOCAPRE $26.25 Previews of SESAR and THE CHINESE LADY
 Regular Performances of SESAR
with code: TRMOCAREG OCTOBER 25 – NOVEMBER 1
This discount is also available on TODAY TIX for a Limited Time
TRMOCAREG $34.25 SESAR and THE CHINESE LADY

MEET “THE CHINESE LADY” AND HER INTERPRETER

 

Inspired by the true story of the first Chinese female to step foot in America, THE CHINESE LADY is a tale of dark poetic whimsy and a unique portrait of the United States as seen through the eyes of a young Chinese woman. In 1834, Afong Moy is brought from China to America and put on display as THE CHINESE LADY for a paying public hungry for the exotic mysteries of the East.

But who is looking at whom?

“Though Afong Moy did not speak English, visitors could communicate with her because she was accompanied by her interpreter—a Chinese man named “Atung.” Since audience members wondered about her life in China, the practice of foot binding… her impressions of New York, Atung fielded such questions and translated them for Afong Moy. Atung also made sure Moy did not remain seated for long; every few minutes, he would say a few words in Chinese, prompting Moy to rise from her chair and hobble with difficulty across the room before returning to her seat.” —An excerpt from, “The Chinese Lady and China for the Ladies Race, Gender, and Public Exhibition in Jacksonian America”. With permission By Prof. John Haddad

TICKETS for “THE CHINESE LADY” 11/7 – 11/18 THEATRE ROW

Shannon Tyo is “Afong Moy”

 

Shannon is an actor, singer, writer, and musician based in New York City. She was born in Seoul, South Korea, and adopted into her family at three months old. Shannon was raised in Rochester, New York, and attended Syracuse University for Musical Theater. Shannon has been recently seen in NYC productions of Kentucky (EST), Bikeman (Tribeca PAC),  and Dear Edwina (DR2),See more at  shannon-tyo.comfrom the Barrington Stage Production of THE CHINESE LADY:
“Ralph B. Peña’s perfectly paced direction is the narrative of a character based on the country’s first female Chinese immigrant who tours the country hoping to bridge the gap between East and West. What’s really going on, though, is a story of horrific betrayal by her American producers and, in fact, the betrayal of Chinese immigrants by America itself. Suh’s poetic writing and Shannon Tyo’s superlatively subtle acting make the history come to life in a profoundly moving way.” —J. Peter Bergman, The Berkshire Edge

Daniel K. Isaac is “Atung”

 

Daniel’s Off Broadway Credits include, The Gentleman Caller (Abingdon), Sagittarius Ponderosa (NAATCO), Underland (59E59), Anna Nicole the Opera (BAM). Daniel can be seen in current episodes of Showtime’s “Billions”. Daniel began writing several years ago in order to share conversations he had with his ultra-conservative, uber-Christian, Korean immigrant, single mother:  According To My Mother.        
See more at DanielKIsaac.com
TICKETS for “THE CHINESE LADY” 11/7 – 11/18 THEATRE ROW

 


 

10/25 READING / DISCUSSION OF “THE CHINESE LADY AT MOCA

 at the MUSEUM OF CHINESE IN AMERICA
ON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018 AT 6:30 PM 

Learn more about America’s first female Chinese immigrant, Afong Moy, and her interpreter. The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) and Ma-Yi Theater Company will present an excerpt from the play, THE CHINESE LADY, which is performing on Theatre Row from November 7 through November 18, 2017. After the reading, there will be a post talk-back discussion with the writer and creatives.

$10 ADMISSION. MOCA MEMBERS FREE. 
215 Centre Street New York, NY 10013            855-955-MOCA             MOCAnyc.org
10/25 READING / DISCUSSION OF “THE CHINESE LADY AT MOCA 

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TICKETS for “THE CHINESE LADY” 11/7 – 11/18 THEATRE ROW

“SESAR” PREVIEWS OCT 20

 

GET A QUICK LOOK AT “SESAR” WITH DIRECTOR RICHARD FELDMAN AND PLAYWRIGHT / PERFORMER ORLANDO PABOTOY.
 
TICKETS for SESAR 10/20-11/1 THEATRE ROW

 

October 26 and 27
From our friends at Leviathan Lab, in association with The Tank:

 

In 2016, Leviathan originally explored the immigration crisis in our Living Room: Immigrant series. In 2018, the crisis has continued to escalate worldwide. Here in the U.S., between 45’s abhorrent zero-tolerance immigration policies that have led to the separation of families and the imprisonment of immigrant children in internment camps; and his racist dog whistles that denigrate black and brown people, there is more to explore and bring to light than ever.All bar proceeds from the event will go toward supporting Immigrant Families Together, a network of Americans committed to rapid response unification of families separated by the ‘zero tolerance’ policy.
TICKETS FOR “THE WALL- Immigration in the Time of 45″

REHEARSALS BEGIN, “Sesar” and “THE CHINESE LADY”

 In Orlando Pabotoy’s play SESAR, a father and his 14-years old son, who is fascinated by the verse and power of poetry in Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar,” try to make sense of the play. Using his own experiences as a former town mayor, a father teaches his son about ambition, betrayal, and love.
REHEARSALS BEGIN:
WATCH THE INTERVIEW WITH SESAR DIRECTOR RICHARD FELDMAN AND PLAYWRIGHT / PERFORMER ORLANDO PABOTOY.
SESAR
The father and son in SESAR come from the island province of Bohol, in the center of the Philippine archipelago. In SESAR there are passages spoken in Boholano, the local dialect used on the island. Don’t worry, most of the play is in English and you won’t get lost. In this clip, Orlando teaches Richard how to count in Boholano. Give it a try:

TICKETS for SESAR 10/20-11/1

THE CHINESE LADY
Next up at Theatre Row is Lloyd Suh’s THE CHINESE LADY, inspired by the true story of the first Chinese female to step foot in America, A tale of dark poetic whimsy and a unique portrait of the United  States as seen through the eyes of a young Chinese woman. In 1834, Afong Moy is brought from China to America and put on display as THE CHINESE LADY for a paying public hungry for the exotic mysteries of the East.But who is looking at whom?

TICKETS for THE CHINESE LADY 11/7-11/18

TICKETS for SESAR 10/20-11/1

Meet The Designers for “SESAR” and “THE CHINESE LADY”

TICKETS for THE CHINESE LADY 11/7-11/18

TICKETS for SESAR 10/20-11/1

MEET OUR AMAZING DESIGN TEAM
Georgia Junghyun Lee, Fabian Obispo, Oliver Wason and Dan Scully make up the design team behind SESAR and THE CHINESE LADY at Theatre Row.
Orlando Pabotoy writes and performs his one-person play SESAR, directed by Richard Feldman. SESAR plays from October 20 to November 1, 2018. Next is Lloyd Suh‘s THE CHINESE LADY, a co-production with Barrington Stage Company, directed by Ralph B. Peña, and featuring Shannon Tyo (“Bright Half Life”) and Daniel K. Isaac (Showtime’s “Billions”). THE CHINESE LADY plays from November 7 to 18, 2018.
Junghyun Georgia Lee is our set and costume designer for SESAR and THE CHINESE LADY. A graduate of the Yale School of Drama, Georgia was born in Korea, and works out of New York. She previously designed costumes of Ma-Yi Theater’s productions of “American Hwangap,” and “Teenage Dick.”  Her designs have also been featured at The Play Co., Guthrie Theater, and Huntington Theatre Company, to name just a few. Read more about her here: junghyunleedesign.com
Oliver Wason is our lighting designer for both plays as well. Another graduate of the Yale School of Drama, Oliver has previously designed shows at Ma-Yi Theater, incuding “House/Rules,” “Among the Dead,” and “Peer Gynt and The Norwegian Hapa Band.” Read more about Oliver at oliverwason.com
Fabian Obispo is our Sound Designer for SESAR and THE CHINESE LADY. Fabian is a long-time Ma-Yi Theater collaborator. He has designed sound and composed original music for many Ma-Yi productions including “Caucasian Chalk Circle,” Portrait of the Artist,” “Flipzoids,” “Mother Courage,” and “Among The Dead,” to name a few. He is currently working on a new musical with Jessica Hagedorn that Ma-Yi Theater will premiere in 2019.
Dan Scully is our Projection Designer for SESAR. Dan is a Brooklyn-based projection designer with a background in performance and computer technology. His more recent works include “If/Then” (National Tour), “Rocky”(Broadway), “Jedermann” (Salzburger Festspeile), “Another Night” (Alvin Ailey/ADT), “The Orchestra Moves!” (Carnegie Hall), and “When The Wolves Came In” (Kyle Abraham/Abraham.In.Motion). Read more about Dan at danscully.com

TICKETS for SESAR 10/20-11/1

TICKETS for THE CHINESE LADY 11/7-11/18

Diversity for Dummies Part Two: Why The Best Intentions Sometimes Fail

 Diversity for Dummies Part Two

Why The Best Intentions Sometimes Fail

An essay by Ralph B. Peña, Producing Artistic Director, Ma-Yi Theater Company —  from HOWLROUND THEATRE COMMONS

“A request for more diversity isn’t really a plea to embrace stimulating heterogeneity. It’s a plea to embrace minimal decency.”

 

Noah Berlatsky wrote those two sentences in the Los Angeles Times in 2017. The words tug at the heart. Who can argue against embracing minimal decency—being more mindful of others? Didn’t our own mothers drill as much into our little heads? But what is most striking in Mr. Berlatsky’s statement isn’t the altruism implied by the word “embrace,” it’s the power dynamic embedded in the word “plea.” It’s an accurate description of how the mandate of diversity has played out, with those on the outside pleading to be let in, hoping those on the inside has some reserve of minimal decency. Forget getting embraced.That’s messed up. It’s also at the core of why many diversity initiatives go wrong. When the disenfranchised have to make appeals to be let in, it only reinforces the prevailing power structures. It’s a concession by the gatekeepers that their current practice of homogeneity is no longer acceptable. And while that may be true, it inevitably discounts the value that diversity brings to the organization. It’s not only about making space for others who don’t look and think like you, it’s how everyone at the table recognizes the change as an opportunity to be better.

Put Diversity at the Heart of the Creative Process

Some theatres look at diversity as an imposition, or worse, something necessary in order to avoid attracting the attention of the liberal police. We’ve seen theatres make corrections mid-season, changing casts, or swapping out plays for more politically correct options. When it’s done after the fact, it comes off as reactive, a “concession.” It’s not fair to those who might be affected, especially for artists who lose jobs because of the decision. It also puts the replacements in an awkward position, knowing their opportunity comes at the cost of others losing theirs. Diversity shouldn’t be a zero-sum game. One way to avoid this is to begin every project from a place of inclusion.

Diversity should not be an imposition, an afterthought, or a means to raise your chances for getting a grant. It should be at the heart of your creative endeavors.

 

Some theatres around the country, like the Public Theater in New York, now make “radical inclusion” part of their mission statement. I first came across this term at the 2007 World Social Forum in Nairobi, Kenya. “Inclusion to the point of discomfort,” was how it was first explained to me. For a theatre company, what might that mean? In the years since Nairobi, I start every process by asking myself a question: who’s not in the room and why? This applies to both artists and audience. The answers are often uncomfortable but eye-opening.Many of you will recognize this scenario. A director has found the perfect cast, with a knockout creative team. Everyone is thrilled, except for one pesky uber-liberal staff member who points out that the whole of the enterprise is blindingly white, and almost entirely male. Whoops. After a moment of self-flagellation for the oversight, and to the relief of the theatre’s suddenly concerned leadership, the director agrees to recast one role and change one designer. A press release announces the theatre’s now diverse creative team, and a box of wine is passed around to celebrate. Meanwhile, back in the rehearsal room, everyone has their game face on quietly justifying in their minds the new Asian cast member’s role in the court of Louis XIV.Okay. That’s probably an extreme example. There are times when casting for diversity’s sake can be a liability.The point is, diversity should not be an imposition, an afterthought, or a means to raise your chances for getting a grant. It should be at the heart of your creative endeavors.“At the where of my what now?” you ask.Go back to how it all started. Who decided to put up a play about the court of Louis XIV? What led to the greenlighting of this project? Who were the decision-makers? Who chose the director? How was it cast? Who was allowed to audition? Was diversity an intrinsic part of the process, at every juncture? Was it a clearly stated goal that everyone heard and understood?
Many theatres think of themselves as diverse, and consider diversity a given in everything they do. That’s not always true. As an artistic director of color, for a theatre company dedicated to Asian American artists, I still have to step back and consider my own areas of improvement. Have I fostered an environment of inclusion? For example, what did we do to make sure we reached out to the disabled and transgender communities? What kinds of faces and bodies are represented on stage? Do they have agency in telling their stories?The answers will not always be ideal. There will be mistakes, and outright failures. What you do with those missteps, how you bring all the stakeholders in the room to address the challenges is what keeps diversity beating at the heart of your organization. Diversity is about and made up of people. It lives and breathes.

Diversity is Not Just an Ideal—It’s Also About Real People and Their Feelings

 

One of the most ignored aspects of diversity in the workplace is the psychological and emotional churn that comes with change, especially when it involves recalibrating the power levers.Let’s be clear. Diversity is not only about bringing in people of varying ethnicities, gender, or physical abilities. It’s about putting them in positions of power. And because we’re dealing with people, there are likely plenty of feelings involved. Allowing emotions to fester, unaddressed, leads to plenty of resentments and dysfunction.

It’s not enough to require your employees to attend a day-long seminar on bias identification. You have to make it part of your daily work life. Talk about it. That’s easier said than done. Ask yourself about what scares people when talking about diversity? Some worry that feelings will get hurt, or they want to avoid trouble so shutting up is the best course. You’ll get different answers. What’s important is making space for every individual to feel valued, and heard.

Studies suggest that pitching diversity as a “must-do, or-else” directive makes people defensive. No one wants to be told they are biased, so avoid negative messaging around diversity practice. Instead, invite people to participate. When they show up, it’s because they’re personally invested in the process, and they chose to be a part of it.

Diversity is not only about bringing in people of varying ethnicities, gender, or physical abilities. It’s about putting them in positions of power.

 

Break the Habit

How’s this for a mission statement? “We aim to provide a welcoming, non-confrontational place where audiences can relax and enjoy worlds that do not differ from their own.”I don’t know about you, but this is not how I want to experience art. In fact, there are probably zero theatres that have this for a mission statement. And yet, many practice this type of “safe” programming, unwilling to disturb the status quo, reluctant to alienate a steady subscriber base, or, unable to conceive of the court of Louis VI peopled by actors of color.

“But there are times when casting for diversity’s sake can be a liability.”

I don’t mean to pull a “gotcha,” moment, but if you agreed with my previous statement, then we need to talk. The court of Louis XIV can be diverse; it can have Asian, Latinx, and Native American actors in it. It’s theatre, and using the “authenticity” excuse to cast only white actors is a form of bias. That’s right, for the most part, authenticity is code for bias. It’s used to exclude people that don’t belong…and in most cases, it’s used against artists of color.

I can already hear a voice saying, “If authenticity is not a thing, then white actors should be able to do August Wilson plays.”

Go directly to jail. Do not pass Go.

We don’t live in a world where all things are equal. Artists of color, artists with disabilities, and transgender artists have far, far fewer opportunities to work. Diversity initiatives in the theatre are meant to increase those opportunities. One way to do that is to put them in all plays. That is what’s meant by break the habit. Make a conscious decision to put diversity on your stages, every time.

Read the full article HERE and leave comments.

 OCTOBER 9, 2018  https://howlround.com/diversity-dummies-part-two

About the Author:
Ralph B. Peña is a founding member and the current Producing Artistic Director of Ma-Yi Theatre Company, a leading professional Off-Broadway theater based in New York City focused on developing and producing new works by Asian American playwrights. Recent directing credits include: the world premieres of Lloyd Suh’s The Chinese Lady, Hansol Jung’s Among the Dead and A.Rey Pamatmat’s House Rules for Ma-Yi;  a new translation of The Orphan of Zhao, for Fordham Theater; Nicolas Pichay’s Macho Dancer: A Musical for The Virgin Labfest 11; Lloyd Suh’s “The Wong Kids in the Secret of the Space Chupacabra Go (Off Broadway Alliance Award),  Joshua Conkel’s Curmudgeons in Love (EST Marathon), and Mike Lew’s microcrisis (Youngblood, Ma-Yi). Ralph is the recipient of an Obie Award for his work on The Romance of Magno Rubio, and is a member of The Ensemble Studio Theater, and The Ma-Yi Writers Lab.

“SESAR” Provides Adults with Autism Philippines (AAAP) Benefit October 28

GET TICKETS HERE FOR $75 or $100 for VIP SEATING

Proceeds from The October 28 Matinee at SESAR (arrive at 2Pm) will contribute to AAAP’s (Adults with Autism Philippines) capital campaign fund for establishing this first residential and work facility devoted exclusively to adults on the Autism spectrum.

GET TICKETS HERE FOR $75 or $100 for VIP SEATING

for the performance of SESAR, October 28, arrive at 2PM, 2:30 Showtime.

410 West 42nd Street, NYC between 9th and 10 Avenue Theatre Row

Yes, it is a little more expensive than a regular ticket but proceeds will benefit the following causes:

Adults with autism need work spaces, recreational areas, and homes suited to their individual, often unique, and lifelong needs. The mission of the Association for Adults with Autism Philippines (AAAP) is to help these adults accommodate those needs by developing the first community where these adults, living with their peers and independently of their families of origin, will grow and thrive in safe and comfortable conditions.

AAAP is poised to build the first structures for this community, a home and an activity center, to be located in the town of Alfonso, Cavite province, in the Philippines.

Come join us to watch a beautiful story about the blossoming of a relationship between father and son when they discover the power of the word of William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, enjoy an outstanding play, and know you’re contributing to a worthy cause!

Ma-Yi Theater Company salutes the efforts of AAAP in bringing recreational and domestic facilities to adults who suffer for Autism in The Philippines.

Find out more about AAAP HERE

 

Meet “THE CHINESE LADY” playwright, Lloyd SUH

Suh’s play “THE CHINESE LADY” is the most recent of many Ma-Yi Productions spanning over 20 Years 

TICKETS FOR “THE CHINESE LADY” 11/7 thru 11/18

Lloyd Suh was one of the founding members of the Ma-Yi Writers Lab. He would go on to be co-director of the Lab with Qui Ngyuen, the two of them presiding over the expansion of the Lab’s membership to nearly double its original size. 


Ma-Yi Theater produced Lloyd’s play “The Children of Vonderly,” in 1998. It was his first professional production in New York City. Other productions soon followed: “American Hwangap,” co-produced with The Play Company, “Jesus in India,” and “The Wong Kids in the Secret of the Space Chupacabra Go!” in partnership with the Children’s Theater Company in Minneapolis.

“The Chinese Lady,” was commissioned by Ma-Yi Theater, and co-produced with Barrington Stage Company. It opened in the Berkshires this summer, receiving rave reviews from local critics.

“I’ve gotten to know Lloyd’s writing over the years, and this play is unlike any he’s written before,” says Ma-Yi Theater’s Artistic Director Ralph B. Peña of “The Chinese Lady.” “This is a deeply felt and beautifully imagined telling of the life of a 14-year old Chinese girl, arriving in America in 1834, to be put on display as she performed her ethnicity. It says a lot about who we are as country.”

Tickets for “THE CHINESE LADY” 11/7 thru 11/18
BUY A TICKET TO “THE CHINESE LADY”
AND GET INTO MOCA FREE

FREE admission to the museum during the entire month of November with your ticket stub 
The Chinese Lady plays in repertory with “Sesar” by Orlando Pabotoy and tickets are now available for both performances at Theatre Row:

Tickets for “THE CHINESE LADY” 11/7 thru 11/18

Get Tickets for “SESAR” 10/20 thru 11/1, 2018

October Lab Member Updates, Upcoming Performances

Ma-Yi Writers Lab Playwright
Leah Nanako Winkler

Labbie, Leah Nanako Winkler’s “Hot Asian Doctor Husband”  at Theater MU

Theater Mu’s 2018/2019 season will include the world premiere of  Labbie, Leah Nanako Winkler’s Hot Asian Doctor Husband (Aug. 16-Sept. 1 2019), at Mixed Blood Theatre. The comedy is about a biracial woman in pursuit of a hot Asian doctor husband after the sudden death of her Japanese father leaves her questioning her identity. Randy Reyes will direct.

READ MORE HERE

©2018 RICHRYAN

Above from the play “Two Mile Hollow” by Leah Nanako Winkler at Theater Mu in 2018. (Photo by Rich Ryan)


 

 Labbie Diana Oh’s ” THE INFINITE LOVE PARTY” at the Bushwick Starr January 2009.

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Diana Oh

“The Infinite Love Party”  January 11 – February 2, 2019 more HERE

 Also, in February, Ma-Yi Theater Company teams with the Bushwick Starr as Co-Producer of SUICIDE FOREST, by Kristine Haruna Lee and directed by Aya Ogawa.

MORE HERE

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Labbie Mia Chung’s  NYC professional debut “CATCH AS CATCH CAN”

opens at the New Ohio Theater October 22nd through November 17.

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Mia Chung

The Phelans and the Lavecchias grew up together in working class New England, weathering good times and bad. But Tim Phelan’s homecoming this winter sets off a spiraling crisis that strains their hold on each other—and themselves. In Mia Chung’s Catch as Catch Can, six characters are brought to life by three actors playing across gender and generation, capturing father/daughter and mother/son in a family drama that doubles as a theatrical tour de force.. directed by Ken Rus Schmoll. READ MORE

Chung’s plays include You for Me for You and This Exquisite CorpseYou for Me for You had a U.K. premiere at the Royal Court Theatre, a US premiere at Woolly Mammoth Theatre in DC, and multiple productions around the country,
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Labbie Mrinalini Kamath is connecting with Seattle and finding inspiration

for-online

Mrinalini Kamath

ROXANNE RAY OCTOBER 8, 2018 , INTERNATIONAL EXAMINER

Labbie, Mrinalini Kamath has been the Ma-Yi Theater/ University of Washington Mellon Creative fellow, and that has allowed her to present work at the University of Washington in both January and June of this year. “The Mellon Creative fellowship that Todd London at the UW School of Drama began with Ralph Pena at the Ma-Yi Theater Company, with the blessings of the Mellon Foundation, was my first encounter with theater in Seattle,” she said.

“I was hooked after my first playwriting class,” Kamath said. “The reaction of a live audience was unlike anything I had ever experienced writing fiction.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

 


 

PLAYWRIGHTS FOUNDATION/ BAY AREA PLAYWRIGHTS FESTIVAL INCLUDES TWO LAB MEMBERS:

MADHURI SHEKAR AND DUSTIN CHINN

Ma-Yi Writers Lab Member

Madhuri Shekar

Dustin Chinn

Dustin Chinn

HOUSE OF JOY BY MADHURI SHEKAR

seduction, skullduggery and swordplay in a mythic 17th Century rebellion by the female bodyguards of an Imperial Harem.

COLONIALISM IS TERRIBLE, BUT PHO IS DELICIOUS BY DUSTIN CHINN

an irreverent satire on colonialism as seen through the transformation of a bowl of noodle soup over two centuries.

 


 

THE LARK NAMES  LAB MEMBER LAUREN YEE AS NEW RITA GOLDBERG PLAYWRIGHTS’ WORKSHOP FELLOW

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ALONG WITH NATHAN ALAN DAVIS, BRANDEN JACOBS-JENKINS, SYLVIA KHOURY, LAUREN YEE, AND ARTHUR KOPIT AS NEW RITA GOLDBERG PLAYWRIGHTS’ WORKSHOP FELLOWS

The Lark announced five New York City-based playwrights, have been named as the 2018-19 Rita Goldberg Playwrights’ Workshop Fellows. The group spans a wide range of backgrounds and professional experiences and will meet regularly throughout the year to develop new plays.

Labbie, Lauren Yee is among them. Yee recently won the Horton Foote Prize for her play Cambodian Rock Band, developed through The Lark’s Roundtable program.

“The Rita Goldberg Playwrights’ Workshop is designed to be a process where a dynamic group of contemporary playwrights can engage with each other around brand new, raw, and challenging work,” said THE CHINESE LADY playwright Lloyd Suh, Director of Artistic Programs at The Lark and a Member and co-founder of THE MA-YI WRITERS LAB. “This cohort of five writers represents such an eclectic range of styles and sensibilities, and yet all five have proven themselves to be rigorous in telling urgent, vital stories in unexpected and imaginative ways. We’re thrilled that they’ll be sharing space with each other and with The Lark over the course of the season.”

Plays substantially developed through the Rita Goldberg Playwrights’ Workshop include Teenage Dick by Ma-Yi Lab Co-Director, Mike Lew (The Public Theater).


 

PANASIAN REPERTORY THEATRE presents Labbie Damon Chua‘s “THE EMPEROR’S NIGHTINGALE”

42nd Milestone Season | Tisa Chang, Artistic Producing Director
Presents a Holiday Special for Families and Children

MORE HERE

Damon Chua

Damon Chua

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 Abingdon Theater presents “Hatefuck”

by Lab Member and Ma-Yi Mellon Reisident Playwright, Rehana Lew Mirza 

Abingdon Theatre Co, WP Theatre & Colt Coeur Partner to Present New Play By Rehana Lew Mirza

REHANA LEW MIRZA

The world premiere of the 2017 Kilroys List play opens in March 2019: Abingdon Theater Company will team up with WP Theater and Colt Coeur to present  HATEFUCK by Rehana Lew Mirza and directed by Adrienne Campbell-Holt. The four-week limited engagement runs March 3 – 31, 2019 at WP Theater

In this bracingly insightful new play, passions ignite when Layla, an intense literature professor, accuses Imran, a brashly iconoclastic novelist, of trading in anti-Muslim stereotypes. But as their attraction grows into something more, they discover that good sex doesn’t always make good bedfellows. Conflicting cultural identities collide in this thornily clever antidote to a “meet-cute” romance.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE

 

 

 

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The Labbies
Ma-Yi Theater Company 520 Eighth Avenue, Suite 309 New York, NY 10018 212.971.4862 info [at] ma-yitheatre.org